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Archive for September, 2012

Chip Linton, an airline pilot, ditches his crippled passenger plane into Lake Champlain after a bird strike; 39 passengers and crew are killed. Chip now suffers post traumatic stress disorder and can no longer fly. To help recuperate and restart their lives, Chip, his wife and 10-year old twin daughters move to an old Victorian house in New Hampshire where the basement reveals a door long sealed shut with 39 six-inch-long carriage bolts. Thirty-nine passengers, thirty-nine carriage bolts. Chip becomes obsessed with what is behind the door that is so securely sealed. Meanwhile his wife notices that the women in their new town are also obsessed with herbs of all kinds as well as her twin daughters. A great Halloween read!

 

Reviewed by Mrs. Vaughn

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Snow, wind, relentless cold and the need to survive in a government controlled society are but a few of the obstacles Willo must overcome to find  out where he belongs. When his family disappears from the mountain where they have sought refuge from government controlled settlements, Willo sets out to find them and return to the clean air, fresh meat, and relative comfort of living in the forest. Along the way he discovers that his father was not who he said he was and that people in the settlement are seeking to find Willo and bring him to safety. Government soldiers are doing everything in their power to make sure that doesn’t happen. After the Snow is full of nail-biting adventure and the consequences of too much government involvement in the lives of people faced with a crisis.

 

Reviewed by Mrs. Vaughn

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If ABC’s The Bachelor, The Hunger Games, and Ally Condie’s Matched got together and had a baby, The Selection would be the resulting bundle of joy. The story takes place in a futuristic United States which is no longer the US as we know it; it is now a monarchy that was established after gaining independence from China. It’s an interesting storyline. Add to this society a strict caste system where it’s difficult to date and marry “down” and, of course, a secret romance that has blossomed between our heroine, the beautiful yet humble America Singer and her impossibly handsome friend Aspen (ahem, Matched). As the prince, an only child, comes of age, an invitation is sent out to every available maiden in the land to apply for “The Selection”. If chosen to compete, the candidate’s family is immediately raised to a higher caste. The winner becomes, what else? The Princess. 35 girls are selected to live in the palace and compete for the Prince Maxon’s heart and hand. It’s a sort of Bachelor reaping, isn’t it?! Brokenhearted America applies and is selected to compete. She goes with a guarded heart, only intending to enjoy the abundance of food and to help her family, but when she gets to know the real Prince Maxon, things take an interesting turn. Beyond some catty girl behavior and strange, violent attacks by rebel groups, this is a fun, light young adult read, most definitely part one of a series, and would be a good read for anyone who is into the aforementioned pop culture.

Reviewed by Mrs. Archambault

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Are you looking for something really good to fill the void left by your last favorite book? If you’re in the mood for a dark page-turner with a plot that twists and turns like the world’s most sinister roller coaster ride, then “Gone Girl” is the book for you. Amy and Nick seemingly have it all. They’re young journalists living the NYC lifestyle and are enjoying their new marriage until they are laid off and family obligations require Nick to move back to his hometown, a small town in Missouri. Living in a rented McMansion with absolutely no character and that Amy absolutely detests, all appears to be going well until the day of their fifth anniversary when Amy goes missing. Through her diary entries, we learn that things are not always as they appear. Do we ever truly know the person we marry? Where is Amy and if Nick did kill her, as all evidence seems to point, then why??? There is SO MUCH to discuss here, I’m recommending this for our next faculty book club read. Most definitely for adult or mature readers.

Reviewed by Mrs. Archambault

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